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Wednesday, February 27, 2008

"Push, Pull, Legs: Hulkster’s Workout Routine"
By Gary "Hulkster Jr."

The Push, Pull, Legs technique is based on focusing efforts on either
Pushing away from the center of your body, or Pulling toward your center.
To utilize this technique you perform Push exercises on day one. Day
two, alternate to Pull exercises. Day three work the legs and the
abdominals. This technique is most effective when two cycles of Push,
Pull, Legs are completed each week. That is, six workout days, at 60
minutes a session, and one day of rest.

Results from natural clients show an increase in strength an average of
25% after two months. This includes clients following the basic rules of
rest/recuperation, diet, and supplementation.

To begin the program utilize light weights and focus on technique.
Ensure your form for every exercise is proper. Slowly increase the
weight lifted as you become more familiar with the Push, Pull, Legs
technique. To ensure you are utilizing the correct weight load for your
fitness level, consider the following: when you wake up the next day,
you should be slightly sore. If your muscles are sore throughout the day,
your weight load needs to be decreased. If you wake up the next day and
are not sore, then increase the weight load. Generally the percentage of
decrease or increase is 10-20% of the current weight so as to gradually
build or decrease your weight load.

For body builders with primary goals to dramatically increase their size
and strength, utilize a program of 4 sets per exercise with repetitions of
12, 10, 8, 6, respectively. For the hard gainers utilize the 4 sets per
exercise with repetitions of 10, 8, 6, 4, respectively. Steadily increase
the weight load with each set.

If you do not experience muscle fatigue by last repetition of set 3, you
need to add more weight. Pay particular attention to muscle fatigue on the
last two sets.

Examples of Push Exercises:

Bench Press, Incline Bench Press, Parallel Bar Dips

Press Behind Neck, Seated Dumbbell Press

Tricep Pressdown, Dumbbell Triceps Extension

Examples of Pull Exercises:

Chin Up, Front Lat Pull Down, Low Pulley Rows

Barbell Curl, Incline Dumbbell Curls, Concentration Curls

Barbell Shrugs

Examples of Leg and Abdominal exercises:

Squats, Leg Curls, Thigh Extensions

Standing Calf Raise, Seated Calf Raise

Ab Crunches, Hanging Leg Raise

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Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Barbell Pullovers
By The Doctor

In the days of yore (which is anything before the late fifties in
the bodybuilding world) doing heavy barbell pullovers was a rite of
passage into bodybuilding manhood. In fact, I read a quote from the
great George Turner that made me chuckle on reading it. He said that
if you were not able to use 250 pounds on the pullover then you were
nothing. Many lifters years ago said that this exercise would be all
that one needed to get a complete upper body workout. Although I do
not see people use this lift often, I must say that 250 pounds would
be rather heavy. Nevertheless, this exercise is on the verge of
becoming extinct. I tried it to see if it was worth bringing back to
the forefront of resistance-training exercises.

A Little Bit about the Pullover

As mentioned previously, this exercise is considered by many to be
the best upper body exercise.

Some people lie across a bench sideways and others lie on the bench
in a regular fashion and perform them. Usually the trainees will
have their preference of dumbbells or barbells. The variables of
body positioning and equipment to use is up to personal preference.

One advantage that is clear is that it removes the weak link of
back work - the biceps - and allows for more direct lat work. The
pullover is also great for those who are into pre-exhaustion
methods or those who want something to use immediately after
high-repetition squats.

What muscles does this exercise work?

Not only do pullovers work the latissimus dorsi but it also targets
the posterior deltoid, the long head of the triceps, rhomboids,
pectoralis major rather well. In addition, it works the following
muscles in a less direct manner: the anterior deltoid, triceps
brachii and wrist flexors.

I do know a few people who have used this exercise and stated that
their triceps were thouroughly worked on completion. What confused
them was that this was not their intended purpose.

How to do it...

Simply lay your back perpendicularly across a bench and grab a
barbell from behind you and bring it to your chest. Then proceed
to extend your arms to where the barbell is above your chest and
your arms are straightened. You have the option of bending your
elbows from there. Lower the barbell or dumbbell behind and past
your head so as your upper arms are parallel or slightly below
parallel to your torso.

Bring the bar back to your chest and repeat the motion until
muscular failure.

I have used this exercise recently and I must say that it is an
excellent addition to my back work when used as my main
latissimus dorsi exercise. I have not used it for pre-exhaustion
yet, but I plan to use it in combination with chins when I do.

This will remove the biceps as the weak link as my back has always
been my least-responsive muscle. It is an upper body exercise so
I would recommend a repetition range from 6 to 10. As with every
other exercise, if you respond better to other repetition ranges,
then by all means use them.

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Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Fox, Big Story w Doug Kennedy on NIU shooter/antidepressants

Wednesday, February 13, 2008

Daily Aerobic Activity is a Must

Regular aerobic activity should be included into everyone’s daily
routine to strengthen the heart and lungs and make them work more
efficiently. Aerobic activity can include running, walking, stair
climbing, dancing, swimming, or any number of other activities that
get the heart working harder for a continuous period of time. Many
people may feel that they need to have a regimented work out program,
and if they do not have at least thirty minutes to an hour to devote
that they can’t do it. This is simply not true, and in fact, this
type of mentality hinders their progress and keeps them from getting
into shape with regular exercise. Short bursts of aerobic activity
can be fit in throughout the day. Take the stairs instead of the
elevator, take a brisk walk around the building at lunch time, ride
a bike or walk to work if within a reasonable distance, or park
further away to get a short walk in.

The benefits of aerobic activity are many, and everyone of all ages
should be encouraged to engage in regular exercise. Even if there
are chronic health conditions present, regular aerobic activity can
be tailored to fit the individual’s needs. A health care provider
should be consulted before beginning any type of exercise program,
and if excessive shortness of breath or chest pain is present,
then the activity should be stopped immediately. Starting out at
a slower pace is recommended for all beginners anyway until some
tolerance is built up, which will happen over time with regular
aerobic activity.

Regular aerobic activity should put the heart in the cardio
target zone, which is computed by subtracting age from 220. This
number of then multiplied by 85%, the result being the maximum
rate at which the heart should beating during aerobic activity.
Beginners should only work out at 70-75% their target heart
rate until their bodies become more accustomed to higher
aerobic activity levels. It’s good to start out slow and
gradually increase aerobic activity as tolerated, maybe with
just a walk around the block. Any amount of aerobic activity
is better than nothing, so get moving! No excuses!

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Thursday, February 07, 2008

Use Dumbbells To Stretch Your Muscles To New Growth

In this high-tech, high-poundage day and age, dumbbells are often the
forgotten tools of mass training. I notice more and more individuals
at the gym using machines with limited ranges of motion or sticking
with the heavy poundage promise of good old barbell training.

For many, if they pick up a dumbbell at all, it’s to move it out of the
way. Oh, they may throw in a few seated curls or some side laterals every
now and then, but these usually come after their "heavy" sets.

If you’re only using dumbbells for biceps and/or shoulder work, you’re
missing out on a truly time-tested piece of equipment. In fact, I’ve
been making some great gains by taking two or three days a month and
using nothing but dumbbell movements. Here are four of my favorites.

FLYE: You can build fairly large pecs with barbell pressing movements,
and you can develop some decent shape with cables and machines; but if
you’re after full, clearly defined, muscular pecs, you’ll want to get
your dumbbell sets in.

I love training chest using dumbbells, and there’s nothing better for
stretching those pecs to some serious new growth than Dumbbell Flyes.
Flat Bench, Incline, Decline — I use them all (though not during the
same session).

The key to doing flyes successfully is control. Lower the weights with
only slightly bent elbows. Throw your chest up towards the ceiling to
really emphasize a full stretch at the bottom of the rep.

As you bring the weight up, concentrate on pulling your pecs together.
Use light weights at first until you’re used to doing the movement with
the emphasis entirely on your pecs. And never smash the weights together
at the top—pull them together and squeeze your pecs tight for a count
of two.

Pull-Over: Another great dumbbell movement for the pecs. I do this
exercise across a flat bench, and I keep my arms as straight as possible
throughout the entire range of motion. Again, getting a full stretch is
the key to stimulating muscle fibers for new growth and added definition.

With pull-overs I tend to like the 10-15 rep range. It’s important not
to turn this exercise into a lat workout or a lying triceps extension.
Keep your arms straight and focus on using the muscles in the chest to
pull the weight to the eye-level position.

Lying Triceps Extensions: Yes, with dumbbells! The exercise is done in
a similar way to the E-Z Curl or Straightbar French Press version.
Lying on a flat bench, you begin with your arms extended above you.
Slowly lower both dumbbells simultaneously by bending at the elbows.
Be sure to keep your upper arms perfectly straight and still.

Then simply push the dumbbells up and lockout at the top, squeezing
your triceps as you do. I find that using dumbbells with this exercise
from time to time, forces me to maintain perfect form and really
blasts my triceps. And the stretch I get is absolutely intense!

Be sure to give these movements a try and let me know what you think.
Above all, don’t forget about those dumbbells over on that rack in
the corner.

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Tuesday, February 05, 2008

Fox News Big Story with Doug Kennedy on Big Pharma's Lie

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